Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

Wildlife Conservation Society was founded in 1895 as the New York Zoological Society (NYZS) and currently works to conserve more than two million square miles of wild places around the world. The organization is led by President and CEO Cristián Samper, former Director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. Based at the Bronx Zoo, WCS maintains approximately 500 field conservation projects in 65 countries, with 200 PhD scientists on staff. It manages four New York City wildlife parks in addition to the Bronx Zoo: the Central Park Zoo, New York Aquarium, Prospect Park Zoo and Queens Zoo. Together these parks receive 4 million visitors per year.[1] All of the New York City facilities are accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums    

WHAT: Conservation of wildlife habitats.
IN DETAIL: Climate change, extinction, human-wildlife coexistence and sustainability top Wildlife Conservation Society’s list of concerns. Founded in 1895, the organization scours the world, helping a variety of wild species – gorillas, tigers and ocean giants included.
WHERE: Worldwide

WCS uses science to discover and understand the natural world. This knowledge helps us engage and inspire decision-makers, communities, and millions of supporters to take action with us to protect the wildlife and wild places we all care about.

WCS scientists study what wildlife species need to thrive. With this knowledge we invest in abating threats to wildlife within their most important strongholds and the corridors that connect them. We target large, iconic, wide-ranging species because of their intrinsic value and because they are vital to ecosystem health. By saving them, we protect all other biodiversity that shelters under their conservation canopy.

Over the past century, WCS has established long-term conservation presence in the last wild places across the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania, built strong and trusting partnerships, and acquired a depth of knowledge that ensures effective conservation action. We protect these last wild places because they are intact, biodiverse, most resilient to climate change, and bastions for large, iconic wildlife species.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

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